Berkeley Hills House | Anderson Anderson Architecture

Berkeley Hills House

This portable classroom is designed to provide an optimized educational environment for students and teachers while advancing sustainable design principles. The classroom maximally conserves as well as collects and generates natural resources, including electrical energy, daylight, wind energy, and rainwater. As well as being strong, efficient and conserving, natural forces and resources are highlighted and exposed throughout the structure, and all systems and performance criteria are monitored and broadcast to the web. The building acts as a learning tool for occupants, other schools and the general public. The combination of maximized photo-voltaic surface and efficiency matched with low energy consumption creates a positive net energy production that is four times the building’s annual consumption.

Design Overview:
The design optimizes photovoltaic roof surface orientation, naturally shaded north-facing daylight glazing, and modulated natural ventilation. All of these forces are balanced with the additional criteria of manufacturing and transport efficiency, functionality for classroom use, low operating costs and ease of maintenance. The manufacturing and delivery process, and the materials and products employed are all selected for minimum environmental impact and for maximum contribution to a healthy indoor environment. Wherever possible, materials are chosen to conserve resources, minimize initial and lifecycle maintenance costs, and to promote educational awareness of the natural environment and its relationship to comfortable and healthy living.

The design focuses on performance issues directly impacting the learning experience of its occupants and the environmental quality of its community—thermal comfort, natural daylighting, indoor air quality, energy and resource conservation and generation.

Materials and Performance:
The building is prefabricated in three easily transportable modules, reducing initial cost and energy, and facilitating efficient relocation and reuse in the future, minimizing waste. A steel frame and steel and rigid foam sandwich panel floor and roof system minimize material use; maximize insulation and heat reflection; and deter pests and mold in the cavity-free structure. A simple, double wall metal cladding, along with metal roofing shaded by solar panels above a 3” ventilated airspace, creates a ventilated double skin greatly reducing heat gain. All glazing is operable and north facing and/or shaded to prevent direct sunlight, and to optimize natural ventilation and comfortable airflow. Interior surfaces are low VOC products. Exposed beams are FSC certified glue-laminated timbers combined with steel trusses to trace primary structural forces. Interior surfaces are naturally finished, low VOC materials to provide good interior air quality.

Daylighting analysis indicates that excellent work light levels are achieved throughout the typical school day in most locations without electric lighting. Thermal comfort analysis indicates the classroom will be comfortable in most high heat climates without air conditioning, although an efficient mechanical air conditioning system is also available as an option for school sites where air quality, or noise conditions preclude natural ventilation.

This portable classroom is designed to provide an optimized educational environment for students and teachers while advancing sustainable design principles. The classroom maximally conserves as well as collects and generates natural resources, including electrical energy, daylight, wind energy, and rainwater. As well as being strong, efficient and conserving, natural forces and resources are highlighted and exposed throughout the structure, and all systems and performance criteria are monitored and broadcast to the web. The building acts as a learning tool for occupants, other schools and the general public. The combination of maximized photo-voltaic surface and efficiency matched with low energy consumption creates a positive net energy production that is four times the building’s annual consumption.

Design Overview:
The design optimizes photovoltaic roof surface orientation, naturally shaded north-facing daylight glazing, and modulated natural ventilation. All of these forces are balanced with the additional criteria of manufacturing and transport efficiency, functionality for classroom use, low operating costs and ease of maintenance. The manufacturing and delivery process, and the materials and products employed are all selected for minimum environmental impact and for maximum contribution to a healthy indoor environment. Wherever possible, materials are chosen to conserve resources, minimize initial and lifecycle maintenance costs, and to promote educational awareness of the natural environment and its relationship to comfortable and healthy living.

The design focuses on performance issues directly impacting the learning experience of its occupants and the environmental quality of its community—thermal comfort, natural daylighting, indoor air quality, energy and resource conservation and generation.

Materials and Performance:
The building is prefabricated in three easily transportable modules, reducing initial cost and energy, and facilitating efficient relocation and reuse in the future, minimizing waste. A steel frame and steel and rigid foam sandwich panel floor and roof system minimize material use; maximize insulation and heat reflection; and deter pests and mold in the cavity-free structure. A simple, double wall metal cladding, along with metal roofing shaded by solar panels above a 3” ventilated airspace, creates a ventilated double skin greatly reducing heat gain. All glazing is operable and north facing and/or shaded to prevent direct sunlight, and to optimize natural ventilation and comfortable airflow. Interior surfaces are low VOC products. Exposed beams are FSC certified glue-laminated timbers combined with steel trusses to trace primary structural forces. Interior surfaces are naturally finished, low VOC materials to provide good interior air quality.

Daylighting analysis indicates that excellent work light levels are achieved throughout the typical school day in most locations without electric lighting. Thermal comfort analysis indicates the classroom will be comfortable in most high heat climates without air conditioning, although an efficient mechanical air conditioning system is also available as an option for school sites where air quality, or noise conditions preclude natural ventilation.

Buy Clomid LOCATION: Berkeley CA

compra lithobid PROJECT SIZE: 3700 sf

comprar aciphex sin receta BUILDING TYPE: Single Family Residential, CNC Prefabricated steel and wood construction

dreamlash NARRATIVE:

This off-site fabricated home on a steep hillside site looking across San Francisco Bay to a panoramic view of San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge is a rebuild following a tragic fire that destroyed an important, mid-century modern home previously on this site. The architects designed with a synthesis of the original architect’s intentions along with contemporary ideas about site, landscape, light and space; the use of local materials and traditional carpentry forms; new construction methods and digital fabrication tools.

The Phoenix house is named for the mythical bird that rose from the ashes of fire to start a new life. This home on a hillside site looking across San Francisco Bay to a panoramic view of San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge is a rebuild following a tragic fire on the site. The original house was built in 1952 by Berkeley architect Henry Hill for the family of a local lighting fabricator who collaborated with many important Bay Area artists, artisans and architects, from early masters such as Julia Morgan and Bernard Maybeck, to the region’s mid-century modern masters. With this legacy, the original home was filled with works of art and craft from local craftspeople and the family’s travels in Asia and the Middle East, much of which was lost in the fire.

Now in the hands of the fourth generation of the original family, the owner charged the architects with the design and construction of a new building on the original courtyard footprint, not a copy of the original, but a new design that collaborates with the ideas of the original architect, an important experimenter in mid-twentieth century Bay Area architecture.

Synthesizing many ideas of the original architect, the new architects used the same local materials and traditional carpentry forms, while experimenting with new methods of construction. Employing off-site prefabrication of modular components, CNC cutting and milling of timber frame, window, and millwork components, laser cutting of all steel components, and off-site panelization of wall and floor assemblies, the building represents a confluence of traditional and experimental technologies. Pre-fabricating most components off-site allowed for considerable savings in time, minimized material and energy waste, and shortened the period of disturbance in the developed neighborhood.

The low-slung, light-filled house is built around a central garden courtyard shielded from the typically strong winds of the site and frequent passage of thick fog. Views, light, privacy and natural ventilation are all carefully modulated on each surface to harness natural qualities and attributes of the site while maximizing indoor/outdoor comfort and minimizing energy consumption. Using local, natural materials and energy-efficient fixtures and systems; practicing resource-conscious building; pre-planning chases, conduits and connections for future energy production systems and evolving media technologies, the house is intended to bridge the celebrated qualities of mid-Twentieth Century modern Bay Area architecture and life with future technologies and current environmental responsibilities. Most importantly, the house represents a respectful evolution in modernist architecture, construction craft, and the unique qualities of joyful life in the natural environment of California.