Tufts University S.I.S. Building

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buy The building is a completely foreign object within the natural landscape, but it is rendered in forms or materials taken from that landscape, successfully blending into a harmonious whole. This is juxtaposed with secondary “built” objects—trees planted in unnatural, buildinglike formations, showing human intervention in nature from another perspective.

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Buy Propecia The building is a completely foreign object within the natural landscape, but it is rendered in forms or materials taken from that landscape, successfully blending into a harmonious whole. This is juxtaposed with secondary “built” objects—trees planted in unnatural, buildinglike formations, showing human intervention in nature from another perspective.

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2006 Progressive Architecture (P/A) Award – Arboretum of the Cascades, Washington

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College of Environmental Design
University of California
Berkeley, California

Commissioned to serve as both an experimental production facility and as a showcase for new material applications and computer-controlled fabrication technologies, this building addition, interior renovation, and courtyard landscape ramp focuses on the minimal definition of large flexible spaces in order to allow for a wide range of activities and continual updating of the design equipment processes. Reflecting the simple, cellular functionality of the Esherick-designed original building, the new addition follows the structural geometry of the existing building frames, but employs new translucent materials and computer-controlled cutting processes to produce a simple enclosure with a functionally complex structural skin. The primary work area is enclosed within a ventilating roof and wall system that holds out the rain while allowing hot air and fumes to exhaust through a continuous matrix of large roof apertures. The double skin of prefabricated polycarbonate panels forms a dense field of thick translucent roof volumes-serving as gutters and ventilator shafts-hovering within a deceptively simple box following outward from the structural bays of the existing building, and acting as a lantern-like pavilion within the large building courtyard. The courtyard will gain a new multi-purpose functionality as an experimental construction space, and informal amphitheater for outdoor lectures and performances. A broad concrete-supported ramp rises upward as a rectangular lawn to gain the full sunlight otherwise escaping the shaded courtyard, and symbolically draws the campus ground through the two story lobby space and into the landscape architecture studios on the building’s fourth floor. With these additions to the courtyard, this previously underutilized outdoor space will become an activated work area for design-build construction activities that integrate students from both the architecture and landscape architecture programs.

 

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Prairie Ladder is an ongoing research project and site installation work exploring the physical and psychological meanings of human settlement on the archetypal American landscape of the western prairie. The project consists of five related structures, each dealing with primal aspects of human experience on the vast horizontal prairie, all related by the element of a ladder with its human scale and equally human defiance of the horizontal limitations of the earth.

The Prairie Ladder project began as a commission from the Connemara Conservancy, an organization with large land holdings in central Texas, with the stated purpose of preserving, protecting, and honoring the prairie landscape. Each year a few artists are selected and given funding to produce an installation on the land, which supports and brings attention to the foundation’s mission. We spent a great deal of time on the site, synthesizing our own experience of this place with the larger tradition of human settlement on the archetypal landscape of the western prairie.

As the project developed, we envisioned a series of big, ladder-related objects spread out all over a large swath of Texas, each focusing on a singular, pure experience of the prairie as a trinity of horizon, earth, and sky. We became intensely interested in this fundamentally American landscape in which human beings have no particular place, where physical and conceptual space can only be understood as a line between the sky, which is no home for human beings, and the below-ground, which is no home for human beings.

The selection of the ladder as an element common to each of the works introduces a vertical axis, marking a departure from the natural horizontal axis of the prairie. The ladder also provides a human scale, and proclaims human defiance of the horizontal limitations of the earth. This real or implied activity of vertical movement on the prairie, whether up into the sky or down into the earth, is the defining characteristic of placemaking—of human settlement or intervention in the existing primal environment.

In acquistare ibuprofen EarthPlane/SkyBarge, we dug down into the earth and built up into the sky and thought about the human ambition to penetrate and possess the earth and the sky and always to stare at and aspire towards the distant line in between. The transparent SkyBarge points into the wind and provides for the climber an oculus focused on the horizon from whence the winds of memory and aspiration blow. EarthPlane cuts open the freshness of the earth and places the inhabitant at eye level with the ground plane. Buried, the viewer is one with the horizon. These vehicles of imagined flight are arrested by the emphatic ladder, which interrupts their flowing motion across the placeless prairie. As always, we had a lot of fun with backhoes and cranes and steel and cable and fiberglass and perforated aluminum and lots of people scratching their heads and wondering what on earth we were doing as they cheerfully pitched in with hard work and all the experience and wisdom of their trades.

hca fit garcinia cambogia kaufen WeatherStation provides a pure and minimal focus on the rotation of the changing/changeless sky. Existing as an object when approached from the exterior, once entered, it becomes an instrument of observation, providing a vantage point and false horizon to facilitate the understanding of the sky as a separate element, without its earthbound delimitations.

comprar barato revatio SunCellar empties a vast cube of earth cut to just below the level of the groundwater. Human access is provided by a heavy lidded ramp and a ladder suspended by cable in a bottomless well. Angled lenses focus sunlight into the depths of the cube to reflect from the floor of water onto the steel-restrained earthen walls and ceiling. The inhabitant stands suspended on a catwalk in the center of this storehouse of aqueous, rippling light, blinded, following a dark descent away from the sky.

compra hydrea Terminus provides a rail-thin line across the prairie, turning upward to form a ladder cabled into the sky. Terminus refers to infinite passage across the prairie and to the nameless, placeless endpoint imagined only as a terminus to travel rather than as a place of arrival: the mythic railroad serving as a metaphor for life on the prairie.

comrar venta biaxin WaterBridge brings the subterranean aquifer to the waterless surface of the prairie in the form of a horizontal bridge of suspended water. The span traverses at horizon level the full length of a narrow incision in the earth, with steel plate walls cutting down to the water table and the life blood of the prairie.

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Detroit Community Pavillion

In collaboration with Andrew Zago

During the first half of the twentieth century, Detroit was among the fastest growing urban centers in America. Many of the city’s leading residents felt threatened by the rapidly increasing density of life and construction, and by the loss of open space, trees, and community gathering places. In response to this threat, community organizations developed to preserve open space, to plant trees, and to counter the developing density of urban construction. Since World War II, an entirely new condition has developed in the city. Massive shifts in the U.S. industrial economy have moved jobs and manufacturing facilities out of Detroit. The process of increasing density has radically reversed, with people and buildings apparently vaporizing into empty space. Unprogrammed open space-full of gradually enveloping plants and trees-has appeared like a cancer throughout the city. Civic groups which had previously focused on planting trees and creating parks and vegetated breathing space have failed to recognize that an entirely new spatial condition needs to be confronted from an entirely new point of view.
This design proposal for a modest community gathering space in an inner city neighborhood of rapidly receding density confronts the issues of density, open space, and community gathering in a type of post-density spatial condition that similarly confronts many other industrial age cities. The project is designed as a community gathering place for an area of typical blocks in Detroit’s inner east-side residential neighborhoods. A common pattern of disappearing buildings and uncontrolled vegetation has emerged in many of these blocks. A greatly reduced number of large single-family homes, small apartment blocks, and detached stores or small-scale fabrication shops remain scattered along blocks filled with vaguely defined lot-line divisions and evidence of past construction, yet currently left open with low grasses, stray trees and wild vegetation. Frequently there are recently burned, gutted, yet still intact buildings.
Covered in grass, there are stacks of brick, burned timber, and scattered building materials. Neat rectangles of empty basement foundations define the pattern of past occupation. There are broad, open vistas across the flat, building-dotted landscape, with the slightly faded towers of downtown Detroit visible in the near distance. Aside from the strangely looming towers, and the frequent small fires and pillars of smoke down the block, large sections of this area of inner Detroit feel almost (unsettlingly) rural.

Recipient of the 48th Annual P/A Awards

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Tufts University commissioned a relocatable building to accommodate Student Information Systems training and office space. After initially exploring the use of leased off-campus commercial office space for this program, Tufts approached the design-build team of Anderson Anderson Architecture and Triumph Modular to help explore options for creating needed office space on-campus in a very tight time frame.

While maintaining industry-standard module proportions dictated by transportation law and factory constraints, this building revolutionizes design and construction quality in terms of ceiling height, acoustics, indoor thermal comfort, indoor air quality, natural light and ventilation, low carbon footprint, healthy and sustainable materials and equipment, and significantly reduced energy use.  Surfaces, materials and colors throughout the space are selected not only for health, sustainability, functionality and hygienic ease of maintenance, but also to provide vibrancy, fun and creative inspiration for the building’s occupants. Portions of the building are repurposed in modified form from a former child care center, and new modules were designed and manufactured to coordinate and expand the structure for an entirely new use, site, and client. The design process was entirely conducted in BIM 3-D computer modeling, included environmental modeling simulations to improve user comfort.

AWARD:

2012 Award of Distinction, from the Modular Building Institute, to Anderson Anderson Architecture for the design of the Tufts University Student Information Systems Building, Medford, MA