Chameleon House | Anderson Anderson Architecture

Chameleon House

  • AAA-02BRO-1
  • AAA-02BRO-2
  • AAA-02BRO-3
  • AAA-02BRO-4
  • AAA-02BRO-5
  • AAA-02BRO-6

Kumamoto, Kyushu Island, Japan

This two bedroom, one bath home—built for two public school teachers on a hillside overlooking Kumamoto, Japan—is planned to become fully energy self-sufficient once all designed systems are phased in. The construction budget of US$154,000—an extremely modest budget by local Kumamoto standards—required a close collaboration of the architects and builder to achieve a high-quality, off-site fabricated timber-frame construction meeting high sustainability standards. Rather than eliminating green technology to remain within budget, the 1100 square foot home was planned for a phased integration of systems, budgeted to be completed with the couple’s current income without increased loans over the coming five years. All essential components of the sustainable design strategy are fully implemented in the original construction, including natural, renewable, healthy materials; optimized solar shading, day lighting, and chimney-effect natural ventilation; solar hot water heating; high-efficiency hydronic heating made ready for future geothermal ground loop and solar thermal roof panels; water catchment roof system planned for a future green roof; and efficiently sized spaces and gardens conducive to simple, indoor-outdoor living with minimal ongoing maintenance and resource investment.

The house is sited on a terraced, south-facing slope in a dense housing neighborhood, overlooking orange groves and a spectacular view of Kumamoto Castle and surrounding hills. The building is sited for maximum views and passive solar heating of the massive concrete floor slabs serving as thermal ballast, and with opening walls facing the prevailing summer winds. The north face of the home has a steeply pitched roof section oriented for photovoltaic panels facing south, and high, operable clerestory windows facing north and upslope, creating optimized day lighting without summer heat gain, and creating a chimney-effect natural ventilation draft drawing air through the home, and exhausting the kitchen, bath and sleeping spaces with cooling updrafts. The house is constructed of simple, robust materials, consisting of concrete, plaster, and locally and sustainably harvested timber.

Credits
Anderson Anderson Architecture, San Francisco; with Nishiyama Architects, Kumamoto Japan

  • AAA-02BRO-1
  • AAA-02BRO-2
  • AAA-02BRO-3
  • AAA-02BRO-4
  • AAA-02BRO-5
  • AAA-02BRO-6

Kumamoto, Kyushu Island, Japan

This two bedroom, one bath home—built for two public school teachers on a hillside overlooking Kumamoto, Japan—is planned to become fully energy self-sufficient once all designed systems are phased in. The construction budget of US$154,000—an extremely modest budget by local Kumamoto standards—required a close collaboration of the architects and builder to achieve a high-quality, off-site fabricated timber-frame construction meeting high sustainability standards. Rather than eliminating green technology to remain within budget, the 1100 square foot home was planned for a phased integration of systems, budgeted to be completed with the couple’s current income without increased loans over the coming five years. All essential components of the sustainable design strategy are fully implemented in the original construction, including natural, renewable, healthy materials; optimized solar shading, day lighting, and chimney-effect natural ventilation; solar hot water heating; high-efficiency hydronic heating made ready for future geothermal ground loop and solar thermal roof panels; water catchment roof system planned for a future green roof; and efficiently sized spaces and gardens conducive to simple, indoor-outdoor living with minimal ongoing maintenance and resource investment.

The house is sited on a terraced, south-facing slope in a dense housing neighborhood, overlooking orange groves and a spectacular view of Kumamoto Castle and surrounding hills. The building is sited for maximum views and passive solar heating of the massive concrete floor slabs serving as thermal ballast, and with opening walls facing the prevailing summer winds. The north face of the home has a steeply pitched roof section oriented for photovoltaic panels facing south, and high, operable clerestory windows facing north and upslope, creating optimized day lighting without summer heat gain, and creating a chimney-effect natural ventilation draft drawing air through the home, and exhausting the kitchen, bath and sleeping spaces with cooling updrafts. The house is constructed of simple, robust materials, consisting of concrete, plaster, and locally and sustainably harvested timber.

Credits
Anderson Anderson Architecture, San Francisco; with Nishiyama Architects, Kumamoto Japan

  • AAA-02BRO-1
  • AAA-02BRO-2
  • AAA-02BRO-3
  • AAA-02BRO-4
  • AAA-02BRO-5
  • AAA-02BRO-6

comrar venta synthroid LOCATION: Lake Michigan, Leelanau County, MI

compra orligal PROJECT SIZE: 6,276 sf

acheter lumigan drop BUILDING TYPE: Single family resident, Prefabricated steel moment frame construction

comprar neem sin receta AWARDS:

2006 AIA San Francisco Honor Award – Chameleon House, Michigan

2006 ACSA Faculty Design Honor Award – Chameleon House, Michigan

2005 AIA California East Bay Award Citation – Chameleon House, Michigan

genneric cialis soft NARRATIVE:

This house is a tower rising above the rolling topography of its cherry orchard site, peering outwards toward spectacular westward views of Lake Michigan and the surrounding agricultural landscape. The site is minimally disturbed, other than the mounding of two earthen enclosures adjacent to the tower, created from the excavated earth of the foundation and offering a ground to contrast the tower experience above the treescape. Due to the slope of the site, the family enters at the third level, descending down to the kids’ bedrooms and bath or moving up to the main living spaces which look out over the orchards to Lake Michigan.

A house would appear as an unsympathetic intrusion in this pure landscape, and with its singular vertical presence rising above the orchard, the tower is intended to reflect the austere, scaleless non-particularity of the occasional farm buildings dotted elsewhere on the hills. To help mask the scale, the building is wrapped in a skirting wall of recycled translucent polyethelene slats, standing two feet out from the galvanized sheet metal cladding of the wall surface on aluminum frames that serve also as window washing platforms and emergency exit ladders. The translucent polyethylene material set out over the dully reflective wall cladding is chosen for its ability to gather the light and color of its landscape, dissolving the finely shadowed and haloed structure into the seasonal color cycle of snow, ice and black twig tracery; pale pink blossom clouds; pollen green leaf and grass; golden straw and vivid foliage. The double skin creates a micro-climate and thermal differential around the structure creating a rippling mirage updraft that in the summer sends steaming condensation or in the winter drips melting icicles.

In order to keep costs and on site labor to a minimum, SIPs panels compose the exterior walls.  A steel moment frame allows for the height of the structure and for loft like spaces within the main living area.  With the use of common materials and industrial detailing, a commercial contractor built the home in eight weeks.